Friday, 28 February 2014

A Window Washing Service On Two Wheels

Phil Prado, who owns a one-person window-washing service business, said he likes working outside because he gets to talk with clients and people on the street. Click to enlarge.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/02/nyregion/a-window-washing-service-on-two-wheels.html?_r=0
A Window-Washing Service on Two Wheels: “Dirty windows are bad for business,” said Phil Prado, 50, giving the rationale for his own business: a one-man, two-wheeled window-washing service that has him pedaling around downtown and Midtown Manhattan.
Mr. Prado uses a bicycle because his customers are often only a few blocks apart in areas where the traffic is as bad as the parking. Because he lives on Staten Island near the ferry terminal, he said, it’s a snap to bring the bike over three mornings a week — he typically works only on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

He is a familiar sight on the street as he rides with a five-gallon bucket of soapy water hanging from his handlebars and an extendable pole under his seat, tied to the crossbar with his chamois window rag. “I like what I do because I have no boss, I’m working outside and I get to conversate with clients and everyone on the street,” Mr. Prado said as he pedaled along Hudson Street one recent weekday, wearing a blue windbreaker bearing his company name, Squeaky Clean Windows Inc., and his cellphone number.

He stopped at Puffy’s Tavern, extended the pole all 18 feet and affixed the spongelike wand soaked with soapy water. Pointing to some smudges on the windows, he said, “Wherever you have sports on TV, you have people leaning up against the glass outside to watch — that’s why sports bars have the dirtiest windows.” After whisking the windows into a lather, he replaced the wand with a 30-inch-wide squeegee and wiped it all dry and clean. “Here’s my overhead, right here,” Mr. Prado said, gripping a bottle of Dawn dishwashing liquid he squirts into the water.

His competitors tend to stay home in the winter, he said, leaving windows to cloud up with dust from the rock salt. “So the winter is when I pick up the bulk of my customers,” said Mr. Prado, who uses waterproof, insulated rubber gloves, and sometimes wears a battery-powered heated jumpsuit under “up to 10 layers” of clothing, which he peels off as he and the day warm up. “The other window-washers get cold because they don’t understand layering,” said Mr. Prado, who was born in New Jersey and began washing windows in Manhattan at age 17, first at the Waldorf-Astoria and then for a business in Brooklyn. He is unmarried but has a girlfriend.

After holding several other jobs, he started his own route on Staten Island 14 years ago, then moved into Manhattan nine years ago to make more money. Mr. Prado said he can handle up to 50 storefronts a day. He cleans each customer’s windows weekly, and charges a monthly fee, starting at $40 for the smallest stores. On Tuesdays, his route takes him from Water Street up to Canal Street. Wednesdays, he roams up to Union Square, hitting SoHo and Greenwich Village. Thursdays, he hits larger storefronts all the way up to West 54th Street to serve the Maserati dealership there.

At night, he lies on a heating pad to soothe his back. His health regimen includes tea with honey, vitamins and an early bedtime. “I haven’t missed a week in 10 years,” he said. “I can’t afford to get sick and leave my windows dirty so Joe Schmo can come in and take my clients.”

While taking care of some high-end shops on Spring Street in SoHo, Mr. Prado said he serviced well over 100 storefronts, but always carries a pile of business cards to attract new customers. “If I see dirty windows, I’m going in with a card and a price,” he said. On West Broadway, he walked past the MaxStudio clothing store and saw streaks on the windows. “Oh, what a shame, I can’t even walk past this place,” he said, and he strode inside. The woman behind the counter said the shop had a window-washer. “If your guy has your windows looking like that, he’s not showing up every week,” Mr. Prado said. He offered her “the best price in New York” and his “first month free” offer.

Jousting for customers can get fierce, he said, like the time when he was in a shop wooing the owner and the washer who held the account showed up. “He threw my tools in the street,” Mr. Prado said. “But I got the client.” Window-washers see a lot through the windows they clean, he said, but “we also see behind us, in the reflection.” Which is why he never needs to lock his bicycle. “Even when my back is turned, I’m watching it all the time,” he said. “Now you know all my secrets.”

More Window Cleaners On Bicycles

Thursday, 27 February 2014

More Window Cleaning Fails

“Despite our alerting the mall management, these cleaning staff continued to work in the same way. They walked on the small edges to clean." “These floors are the empty blocks in the tower, and hot and rainy weather could have weakened the exterior tiles. So the tiles could break and they might slip and fall. Click to enlarge.
http://www.thenational.ae/uae/abu-dhabi-window-cleaners-without-safety-harness-spark-concerns
Abu Dhabi window cleaners without safety harness spark concerns: It was enough to send shivers up the spines of witnesses – two window cleaners disconnecting their safety cables and walking along the thin ledge of a tower on the 13th floor of Abu Dhabi Mall. It was also enough for the mall’s management to cancel its contract with the cleaning company. “The process had been going on for more than half an hour,” said Ramesh Menon, who watched from a nearby building on Monday. “Despite our alerting the mall management, these cleaning staff continued to work in the same way. They walked on the small edges to clean. “These floors are the empty blocks in the tower, and hot and rainy weather could have weakened the exterior tiles. So the tiles could break and they might slip and fall. “These cleaners had not connected their cleaning equipment, such as a brush or bucket, so if these tools slipped from their hands they could fall down and harm others.”

Pradeep Kumar, a window cleaner with MBM Caring for Environment, said workers continued to defy rules stating that safety equipment must be used at all times. “Window cleaners on high-rise buildings still risk their lives,” said Mr Kumar, whose company was not involved in the mall incident. “In fact, they are trained to take the job and asked to wear all safety gear but they still take risks. We are trained for three to four months and assigned jobs in smaller buildings first. “During my two years as a window cleaner I knew a few people who fell from the top and died due to a lack of safety measures.”


Abu Dhabi Municipality regulations state window cleaners must use either a cradle, or two ropes attached to their safety harnesses and the roof of the building. “In comparison to cradles, ropes are very safe and comfortable where one can sit and clean,” Mr Kumar said. “Ropes are tied on top very tightly and you can slide down smoothly, whereas cradles are controlled by machines and sometimes they stop working, get jammed, or fail and suddenly fall. “We call them a single rope but there are two ropes that support the person. Both are hooked with a person’s safety gear.”

The cleaners also use a device called a window keeper, which can be attached to a window like a suction cup. Mr Menon said he alerted the mall management when he saw the cleaners on the ledge. “I called the senior manager of the mall who alerted security of Abu Dhabi Mall, who intervened and immediately stopped them,” he said. “But within half an hour they had cleaned the windows on three levels. Think how fast they work and how dangerous that is.”

Abu Dhabi Mall said it enforced tough rules on cleaning companies and had cancelled the contract of the company for which the two cleaners worked. “On receiving the complaints we immediately stopped them and terminated their contracts with the mall as they were not following safety rules,” said Shri Kumar, security site manager at Abu Dhabi Mall. “They had a safety rope but detached it while cleaning, which is against safety rules. Now we will hire another company for the job.” Abu Dhabi Municipality said it had taken a number of strict measures to enforce building safety. Companies who break the rules face fines of between Dh10,000 and Dh20,000. “Scaffolds, cradles, rope access, cranes and platforms used must conform to the local and international safety standards,” the municipality said.

Window cleaner who fell from balcony airlifted to hospital.
http://www.westsussextoday.co.uk/news/county-news/latest-news/video-man-who-fell-from-balcony-airlifted-to-hospital-1-5904318
Man who fell from balcony airlifted to hospital: A man believed to have fallen from a first-floor balcony while cleaning windows has been airlifted to hospital (Thursday, February 27). Paramedics were called to Liverpool Terrace, in Worthing town centre, at around 12pm this afternoon, following reports a man had fallen. The air ambulance landed on Worthing beach and transferred the casualty to hospital at 1pm. Marc Jeffery, 23, who was at the scene shortly after the incident, said: “It appears it was a window cleaner who was working up there, when the railings gave way. “I saw the paramedics and then the helicopter land.” Another eyewitness, who would not be named, added: “I was working nearby and heard a scream. I turned round and somebody had fallen from the balcony.”

http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/11044003.Worthing_window_cleaner_fighting_for_life_after_fall/
Worthing window cleaner fighting for life after fall: Businesses have rallied in support of a popular window cleaner who is fighting for his life after falling from the first floor of a building. The man, believed to be in his 40s, fell from a building in Liverpool Terrace, Worthing, at about 11am yesterday and was airlifted to hospital with life-threatening head injuries. He is a favourite with the firms in the road whose windows he cleans on a weekly basis using his mobile cleaning unit, which was cordoned off by police yesterday.

Jerome Ennis, partner at Green Wright Chalton Annis solicitors, which is based in the road, said: “It’s just dreadful to hear what has happened. “He’s an absolutely wonderful guy, always friendly and chatty. It’s taken us all aback. We really are so sorry to hear about and we hope he recovers well and quickly.” The emergency services were called to the incident at 11.36am. A staff member from Asphaleia in Liverpool Terrace described how she saw emergency vehicles descend upon the usually quiet road. Staff at John Dixon Salt Optometrist said the road was closed by Sussex Police from just after the accident until 1.15pm. The injured man was put on a stretcher and taken by paramedics to Worthing beach where the air ambulance landed. He was airlifted to Royal London Hospital.

He fell from Sussex Chambers house, which is the base of European Medicines, Cheesemans Solicitors and Advocates, Insure For Travel and Talking Design. Blood was cleaned from the pavement before the injured man’s family were brought by staff from Sussex Chambers. Staff from Worthing and Adur Borough Council cleaned the scene of the incident thoroughly again later in the afternoon. The incident has been passed from Sussex Police to the Health and Safety Executive to be investigated.

http://press.hse.gov.uk/2014/window-cleaning-firms-boss-fined-for-insurance-failings/
Window cleaning firm’s boss fined for insurance failings: The boss of a County Durham window cleaning firm has been fined for failing to prove he held statutory insurance that enables employees to claim compensation should they be injured at work. Darlington Magistrates’ Court heard today (27 February) that Jason Mawson owned and operated a window cleaning business and traded as We-aredale Cleaning. As an employer he was required to insure against liability for injury or disease sustained by his employees resulting from their work.

An inspector from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) invited Mr Mawson to voluntarily produce his insurance certificate on a number of occasions but he failed to do so. He also failed to respond to a formal Notice to Produce on 3 September 2013. Jason Mawson, 44, of Grey Street, Crook, was fined £100 and ordered to pay £755.05 in costs after pleading guilty to breaching the Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969.

After the hearing, HSE Inspector Victoria Wise said: “During 2012/13 148 workers were killed at work, two in the North East, and thousands more were seriously injured or suffered ill-health through the work they did for their employer. “As well as being a legal requirement, Employers’ Liability Compulsory Insurance offers important protection for employers and employees alike. “Without it, if a worker becomes ill or is injured at work, they will not be able to claim compensation from the employer. For employers, insurance covers the cost of legal fees and compensation payouts in the event of a claim by a worker.

“Mr Mawson failed to produce a certificate of insurance and that in itself is a criminal offence. The failure of employers to insure is seen as a serious matter and HSE will continue to take legal action where appropriate.”

1. The Health and Safety Executive is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training, new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk. HSE is also the regulator for Employers’ Liability Compulsory Insurance.

2. Section 4(2)(b) of the Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969 states: Where a certificate of insurance is required to be issued to an employer in accordance with regulations, the employer (subject to any provision made by the regulations as to the surrender of the certificate) shall during the currency of the insurance and such further period (if any) as may be provided by regulations – produce the certificate of insurance or a copy thereof on demand to any inspector duly authorised by the Secretary of State for the purposes of this Act and produce or send the certificate or a copy thereof to such other persons, at such place and in such circumstances as may be prescribed by regulations.

Customers wish window cleaner speedy recovery after fall in Marlborough: Customers of popular window cleaner Robin Salkeld have been wishing him well following his fall from a ladder on Monday. Mr Salkeld was cleaning the upstairs windows of Trevor and Sally Brown’s house in Oxford Street, near the Green in Marlborough, when he fell 30ft through a plastic conservatory roof and on to the stone floor below. He was airlifted by the Wiltshire Air Ambulance to Frenchay Hospital, in Bristol, suffering from servere lacerations, and was discharged from hospital to his home in Great Bedwyn yesterday.

Steve Pascall, who lives opposite the Browns’ house in Oxford Street, knows Mr Salkeld as he is their window cleaner. Speaking on Tuesday, Mr Pascall said: “We feel sorry for him because Robin is such a super guy, so helpful. “It’s so sad when this happens to anybody, but when it happens to someone like him, who is so helpful, it is an absolute tragedy.” Another neighbour, who did not want to be named, said yesterday she heard a terrible crash and thought two cars had collided. She sent her best wishes to Mr Salkeld, and said: “Robin is such a super guy, he's always pleasant and happy. The residents of The Green are very concerned about what has happened and wish him a speedy recovery.  “Anyone you talk to about Robin will say what we have said, he’s such a friendly, happy guy.”
Paramedic Ross Culligan was on the Wiltshire Air Ambulance and he added: “The patient, a gentleman in his sixties, was cleaning the windows of a property. “He fell from the top of a 30-foot high ladder through a plastic roofed conservatory and on to a stone floor below. We don’t know what caused him to fall. “He did sustain serious injuries and the decision was made to take him to a major trauma centre to see a plastic surgeon specialist. “He was conscious throughout and was in very good spirits but in considerable pain.” The air ambulance took four minutes to fly to Marlborough, where it landed on The Common. The flight to Frenchay Hospital took 14 minutes.

Wednesday, 26 February 2014

Window Cleaning Franchise Owners

FOLLOWING HIS DREAM: Former Ford worker Mark McDonald.
http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/11034503.Perfect_franchise_for_former_Ford_worker/
Perfect franchise is window of opportunity for former Ford worker: He worked at Southampton’s famous Ford plant for nearly a quarter of a century before the factory doors slammed shut last year. Now Mark McDonald is striking out on his own after buying a franchise in a city-based window cleaning company. Having been made redundant when the Swaythling Ford factory closed down, he is venturing out into the business world with Perfect Windows. 

The 50-year-old, from Regents Park in Southampton, had spent 23 years with Ford before deciding to set up on his own following redundancy. He said: “Following a long career at Ford, I viewed redundancy as an opportunity to chase my dream of working for myself. “I was introduced to Perfect Windows at a job fair organised by Ford and was really impressed with how professional and busy they are.
Launched at the end of 2013, Mark’s business covers most of Southampton. He added: “Most people struggle to find a reputable and reliable window cleaning company; I certainly have over the years. "What attracted me to running my own business with them is that providing first-rate customer service is just as important to the company as delivering a quality cleaning service. “It’s an ethos that’s built a loyal and growing customer base for them and I’m looking forward now to getting started and building my own business off the back of their success. 

Vin Kennedy, who owns Perfect Windows, said: “We are delighted to welcome Mark to the team. “Having Mark on board means that we can continue to deliver a great service for our growing number of customers and surge ahead with our expansion plans around the region.”

http://centraljersey.com/articles/2014/02/26/newswire/doc530d0eca6b295785556692.txt
New business owner says layoff was a blessing, I have my life back: Robin McKenna, owner of Window Genie of Belle Mead, says business ownership has given her the freedom to create her own schedule, be in control of her success and have the work-life balance she missed in her previous career. Window Genie announces the grand opening of their newest location in Princeton, NJ on Monday March 10th. Robin McKenna is the owner/operator. Window Genie is a nationally ranked home services franchise offering window cleaning, window tinting, pressure washing, gutter cleaning and much more. Window Genie of Princeton will service the surrounding Princeton, NJ areas as well as Bucks County, PA.

Before joining the Window Genie team, McKenna spent 20 years at a medical device company in sales and marketing, more recently in global marketing to develop and commercialize products worldwide. In July 2011 her position was eliminated. McKenna said, “I did what most people do after a layoff. I looked for a similar job because it’s what I was used to. I knew in my heart that I could not go back and feel secure or happy, though.” After some time off, McKenna realized the “blessing in disguise” she was granted by being unemployed. “I had always wanted to be home more while my children were in high school and my daughter is a sophomore this year. Also, unfortunately my parents weren’t doing very well at the time. I was granted this wish I had always had in the back of my mind to be home spending time with family. I was able to take my dad to my children’s swim meets and other functions; it was truly a blessing to spend the precious time together as I decided what to do next.”

McKenna was able to take away a piece of advice from her father before he passed away. He told her, “Take your passions and put them to work for yourself.” McKenna said, “His words and support really meant something to me. It helped me realize that it’s all about family, quality of life and working for you because the return is based on your efforts and decisions. ”

McKenna stopped looking for another corporate job in June 2012 and began focusing solely on business ownership when she met her franchise coach, Bill McGuire of The Entrepreneur’s Source. “I began looking around online at business opportunities and must have left a cookie crumb somewhere because I was approached by Bill. If he hadn’t contacted me, I don’t know where I would be now. His guidance was so essential to getting me where I am today at Window Genie.” They discussed McKenna’s strengths, weaknesses, goals and interests to determine which business models would fit her best. Window Genie was one of them and, “shined amongst all others from the get-go,” says McKenna.
What stood out to McKenna about the Window Genie business was the ability to offer multiple services to repeat customers. She said, “This would give me an opportunity to build relationships in the community and continue to serve that customer for years. Also, with the many different services Window Genie offers, there’s something for every home and every budget; I like that.”

Also, Window Genie’s strong culture and give-back program, Windows 4 Wishes stood out to McKenna. She said, “The corporate team has such a strong, well defined culture. It’s something I’ll be sure I reflect in my business. When I hire a technician I’ll let them know that we work hard and we play hard, we contribute to our community and take pride in our work. These were values so clearly embedded in the Window Genie culture and I felt it just even talking to existing franchise partners during my discovery process that had such fantastic things to say about the business and the corporate team. It feels good to invest in team Genie; it’s an extended family that not only cares about the success of my business but the happiness and fulfillment it brings me.”

Window Genie of Princeton officially opens for business on Monday March 10th. McKenna is excited, saying, “I can’t wait to get back to work and be able to provide people with things they really need and help improve the homes in my area. I’m providing jobs to people in my community and helping them build skills they can use in the future. I’m a planner and organizer so I feel prepared to take on the spring cleaning season and also being very customer oriented I’m excited to just get out there and start building relationships based on professionalism and quality. Two years ago I was unhappy and felt stuck in the corporate world. Being laid off was a blessing that led me to Window Genie. I have my life back.”

"This is a great territory," Bradley said. "It made sense from a business standpoint to bring this service to this area."
http://www.the-news-leader.com/news%20local/2014/02/26/glass-guru-opens-macedonia-franchise-to-restore-replace-windows
Glass Guru opens Macedonia franchise to restore, replace windows (Macedonia) - The Glass Guru, a California-based window restoration and replacement business, opened a new local franchise in Macedonia on Feb. 11. Franchise owner Chad Bradley said the company, founded in 2003, is a unique twist to window replacement companies because it also offers restoration services. "People have been dealing with foggy windows or condensation in windows for years," he said. "For years, the only thing to do is replace that glass. What makes us a little different is that we can restore that window at about half the cost without ever removing the glass."

Bradley said seals on windows typically fail within 15 years, and once the seal breaks, condensation or moisture forms between the window panes. To restore the glass, workers drill holes in the glass and put rinsing, cleaning and drying agents into the window to get the moisture out. They put patented micro-vents in the window to finish the process.

"The one thing I truly like about the business is that its green. We're not taking glass and just throwing it away into dumpsters and landfills, we're restoring it," he said. "The other thing is its really a cost saving thing for the customer. Sometimes they could have a beautiful window frame and they just have a bad piece of glass."

Bradley said it costs about half as much to restore a window versus replacing it, adding his firm can replace windows that cannot be restored. The business also provides free home window inspections and scratch and stain removal. The company has 80 locations in the country, with the Macedonia location serving much of northeast Ohio including Akron, Cuyahoga Falls, Mayfield, Aurora, Streetsboro, Hudson, Seven Hills and Independence. "This is a great territory," Bradley said. "It made sense from a business standpoint to bring this service to this area."


http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/power-pitch/men-kilts-want-clean-windows-115908784.html
Men in kilts want to clean your windows - Some guys in kilts want to help with the household chores—and they do windows. Yes, such a business is being built, and it hopes its kilt-clad lads will “stick out”—though of course not literally. "That's what the premise of the kilt is,” Men In Kilts founder Nicholas Brand told CNBC. “It's to have fun with it, but also to stick out. If somebody stops and takes a picture with us, they won't forget about us."

Brand and CEO Tressa Woods (she actually wears the pants in the company) believe the kilt is their secret weapon and hope to build an empire on it. CNBC gave them just 60 seconds to prove their case. Is the kilt a cheesy gimmick or the ticket to a booming enterprise? Watch the video and see how the Power Pitch panel votes and decide for yourself.

The Men In Kilts business plan is pretty simple: The company offers to do household chores such as window and pressure washing, and gives clients something to gawk at, namely guys in skirts. “We've had screaming—you know, we get a lot of pictures taken whether we're on a job site,” Brand said. “Sometimes you just get out of your truck and you open that door and people can't believe you’re in that kilt.”

The franchise operation serves residential and commercial clients, and the kilt cleaners will do buildings of up to four stories. And Men in Kilts is tackling an industry that’s far from washed out. According to the International Window Cleaning Association window washing is a $7 billion industry. "Our commercial business is 50 percent of our total revenue," Woods said. "I don't think the kilt appeals to the commercial market in the same way it does residentially, but the service is really how we compete."

Woods has experience with franchise businesses. Before joining Men In Kilts in 2010, she was vice president of operations at 1-800-Got-Junk. She told CNBC she was instrumental in growing the rubbish removal company from 40 franchises to 350 in three countries. Since her arrival, Woods said, the company has focused on operations and preparing for growth. "Right now we have nine franchises," Woods said. "We should be at about 15 by the end of this year, and we're hoping to sell about 20 to 30 next year. … From there, the sky's the limit." The company is on target to achieve sales of $5.2 million this year, she added.

The Power Pitch panel included CNBC media and entertainment reporter Julia Boorstin, who’s also a homeowner who hates washing windows. She raised concerns about the kilts. "When you Google window washing, you don't necessarily think that you're going to be searching for someone wearing a kilt," Boorstin said. Brand countered that with the importance of differentiating your business from the competition. “If I started this company 11 years ago and named it Nick's Window Cleaning or AAA Window Cleaning or Bubbly Clean Window Cleaning, we wouldn't be talking today," he said. Power Pitch panelist and real estate entrepreneur Don Peebles had reservations about how Men In Kilts would attract male workers willing to adhere to the unusual dress code.

"It's sort of a self-screening process,” Woods said. “Nobody applies for the job unless they have personality and confidence to wear the kilt." While Power Pitch host Mandy Drury wondered if Men in Kilts hires women (Wo-Men in Kilts?). "We've had some of our best employees actually be women, yeah, so absolutely no rejection of women at all," Brand said. Woods and Brand envision their company in every major North American metropolitan area by 2017. But their goal doesn't end with window washers in traditional Scottish garb. "The nature of the brand lends itself to different franchise services ... like carpet-cleaning, painting and lawn service—whatever is really in demand," said Woods.

XENIA — Remember the old joke about the housekeeper who always says “I don’t do windows…” You don’t have to worry about that when you contact one of the newest businesses in Xenia. “We’re dependable and reliable,” Shane Hartley, owner of the local Fish Window Cleaning location, said. “And, we’re year round.” Hartley, a former police officer in Athens, Ohio, and an US Army vet with 27 years under his belt, said that when he returned from Afghanistan in 2012, he began looking for a business he could own and operate. “I was looking for a different franchise,” he added. “I worked through FranChoice and they matched me up with three potential franchises. “Fish looked to be the best of the three because of three things: the simplicity of its system, the low overhead, and a very needed service.” “The franchises are independently owned and operated,” Hartley said. “We’re licensed, bonded and fully insured. We’re glad to give free estimates for both commercial and residential customers.”

Along with the window cleaning, the Roseville, Ohio native said Fish also cleans gutters and performs light power-washing on soffits and siding. “And, really, we can clean anything glass,” Hartley continued. “We’ve done chandeliers, not to mention other light fixtures.” To prepare for the new business, Hartley completed multiple weeks of training in the Xenia area and at Fish Window Cleaning headquarters in St. Louis, Mo. He is currently hiring and accepting applications. “I am committed to providing quality service and 100 percent satisfaction that FISH customers have come to expect,” said Hartley. “I look forward to meeting my residential and commercial neighbors and becoming the top, reliable provider for window cleaning needs. “So far, I’ve found everyone extremely friendly and I’ve met some great people,” he continued. “I have not had a single business turn me away and not let me write a free estimate.” Hartley is providing his services for commercial and residential customers in East Dayton, Beavercreek, Fairborn, Kettering and Xenia. “My region is pretty much from I-75 east, to Fairborn in the north and south almost to where I-75 and I-675 come together,” he said. Hartley said he currently has a staff of two and is looking to expand. “I am hiring,” he said. “I’ve posted all over. I need two additional employees for going on runs, and I also need a salesperson.”

Tuesday, 25 February 2014

30 Foot Ladder Fall For Window Cleaner

The Wiltshire air ambulance landed on Marlborough Common to airlift Robin Salkeld to Frenchay.
http://www.thisiswiltshire.co.uk/news/11035642.Malborough_window_cleaner_airlifted_after_fall/
Malborough window cleaner airlifted after fall: Window cleaner Robin Salkeld was airlifted to hospital on Monday lunchtime after he fell from a ladder and through a conservatory roof of a house at The Green, Marlborough. Mr Salkeld, of Church Street, Great Bedwyn, was taken to Frenchay Hospital, Bristol with severe lacerations. He was cleaning an upstairs window of a house belonging to Trevor and Sally Brown when the accident happened at around 12.30pm.
 
Sgt Barry Reed of Marlborough police said officers were called to Marlborough Common to clear the area so the air ambulance could land. Steve Pascall, who lives opposite the house in Oxford Street, saw the ambulance arrive. He said: “I don’t think anyone was home because Tony was called and arrived home at the same time as the police.” Mr Pascall who knows Mr Salkeld as he is their window cleaner said: “We feel sorry for him because Robin is such a super guy, so helpful.
 
“It’s so sad when this happens to anybody, but when it happens to someone like him, who is so helpful, it is an absolute tragedy.” Mrs Reed said today: “I do not want to say anything without checking with his wife first.” A spokesman for Wiltshire Air Ambulance said: “A patient who fell 30ft from a ladder and through a conservatory roof was airlifted to a major trauma centre.”

Monday, 24 February 2014

Frozen Tinting & Ideas To Work In The Cold


http://www.windowfilmmag.com/index.php/archives/5247
Too Cold to Tint – Winter Weather Preventing Window Film Installations - If you live east of the Mississippi, chances are you’ve been impacted by the recent onslaught of winter weather. From snow and sleet to freezing rain, schools and businesses in the East and Midwest have been closed multiple times since the start of the New Year. For window film companies, the consistently frigid climate is preventing many installations.

“Because of the cold weather and the cold temperatures we were prohibited to install film,” says Ed Golda (pictured), president of Michigan Glass Coatings in Auburn Hills, Mich. “When we sprayed the glass it froze and you can’t install film over ice. It was challenging. With the weather conditions and snow days, residential customers had their minds on kids and trying to get to work. The last thing on their mind was window film … Everyone is just in survival mode. It’s been a brutal winter.” “We’ve had two days where all of the installers were off. We’ve gotten shut down other days when the glass was frozen,” adds Steve Pesce, president of New York Window Film Co. in Farmingdale, N.Y.

Even south of the Mason-Dixon line, typically warm-weather companies are feeling the chill. Matthew Erbrick, owner of United Home Solutions in Alpharetta, Ga., says his shop has had to close and reschedule work as a result of the weather. “People were very cooperative. We did have to work on Saturday and Sunday which we don’t typically do this time of year,” he says. “It was only a day-and-a-half we had to make up because of the snow. It did affect us—minimally fortunately.”

In the Midwest, Northeast and South, snowy weather is continuing to promise slow working conditions for window film companies. “They’re talking like it’s an apocalypse,” says Erbrick. “We got a little snow, but now they’re talking ice. We’ll probably have to reschedule and work to catch up.” As far as the weather goes, Erbrick says it’s relatively unpredictable. “In Georgia, you just never know until March, but in 1992 we got hit in April with 10 inches of snow, so you just can never tell,” he notes.

Some dealers have a brighter outlook when it comes to improving conditions. “It’s the same as every other year, so it’s nothing new around here,” adds Pesce. “I’m expecting this whole thing to blow over by next week and get warmer. This is one of the few times I can remember where it’s consistently snowing … that’s the only difference.”

For Golda, though, the hits his company has felt since the start of the year have been some relatively tough blows. “I had to let one of our installers go on unemployment. It’s tough. Thank God we diversified into graphics and security films … the air temperatures are just brutal. This has been an extraordinary winter, as we all know,” he says. “The problem is once January is gone, that’s it. There’s no way to get it back. Only the tough will survive. “You keep a positive attitude and keep trucking and hope for a decent February, but the cold just won’t go away,” Golda adds. “When the sun is shining, it does help, at least it starts warming up the glass. But a cloudy overcast day, it’s very difficult.”

To try and maintain business during this time, Golda says his company works in a variety of creative ways. “We’re trying to book out in advance as well as work with the sun when it’s on the East side, then follow it to the West,” he states. “We also try to do a lot of graphics job inside buildings. If we’re in the hallways putting up graphics it’s a little easier because the interior temperatures are 60-70 degrees Fahrenheit. We also try to make introductions and set up business for later on down the year. It’s tough but you have to do what you have to do.”

Left Out in the Cold – Dealers List Their Top Cold-Weather Selling Strategies  January 22nd, 2014 | Category: Industry News   When the temperatures dip, sales for window film companies have a tendency to follow. So just what can your company do to maintain sales during colder weather? According to several dealers in winter weather-prone states, falling back on traditional marketing strategies helps.  “For me a lot of it is referral and repeat business,” says Dave Mow, sales manager for Advanced Solar Solutions in Clawson, Mich. “I keep in contact with all of my customers. Our main source of advertising is the Internet.”  “Work on Sundays,” adds Mark Fravel, owner of Columbus, Ohio-based Quality Window Tint, “which helps because most people in the winter time will wait until they’re off on Saturdays. You can always work on Saturday or Sunday and take Monday off.”  “The main thing we continue to use is word-of-mouth. We have longstanding relationships with construction companies that still need to have work done,” states Jennifer Shepherd, inside sales for flat glass at Absolute Perfection in Sykesville, Md. “We don’t cold-call, but we do rely on repeat customers coming back to us. We also do email promotions … such as $100 off.”  Setting yourself apart from the competition is another area in which dealers say they reel in winter time business.  “Security films are always a big request,” says Mow. “The new low-E coated films are starting to get more requests, especially in our climate.  “We also have [film] which offers summer and winter [heat control] benefits,” he adds. Mow, whose company serves the commercial market, primarily recommends architectural film dealers “go to glaziers unions, architects and glass companies” to try and find additional work.  You really just have to take the initiative,” adds Shepherd. “We have really great customer service; if someone contacts us we get back to them immediately.”
Left Out in the Cold – Dealers List Their Top Cold-Weather Selling Strategies: When the temperatures dip, sales for window film companies have a tendency to follow. So just what can your company do to maintain sales during colder weather? According to several dealers in winter weather-prone states, falling back on traditional marketing strategies helps. “For me a lot of it is referral and repeat business,” says Dave Mow, sales manager for Advanced Solar Solutions in Clawson, Mich. “I keep in contact with all of my customers. Our main source of advertising is the Internet.”

“Work on Sundays,” adds Mark Fravel, owner of Columbus, Ohio-based Quality Window Tint, “which helps because most people in the winter time will wait until they’re off on Saturdays. You can always work on Saturday or Sunday and take Monday off.” “The main thing we continue to use is word-of-mouth. We have longstanding relationships with construction companies that still need to have work done,” states Jennifer Shepherd, inside sales for flat glass at Absolute Perfection in Sykesville, Md. “We don’t cold-call, but we do rely on repeat customers coming back to us. We also do email promotions … such as $100 off.”

Setting yourself apart from the competition is another area in which dealers say they reel in winter time business. “Security films are always a big request,” says Mow. “The new low-E coated films are starting to get more requests, especially in our climate. “We also have [film] which offers summer and winter [heat control] benefits,” he adds. Mow, whose company serves the commercial market, primarily recommends architectural film dealers “go to glaziers unions, architects and glass companies” to try and find additional work. You really just have to take the initiative,” adds Shepherd. “We have really great customer service; if someone contacts us we get back to them immediately.”

Friday, 21 February 2014

Window Cleaning News

Click to enlarge.
http://www.mediabistro.com/fishbowlny/mad-men-saturday-evening-post-sharif-tarabay_b204070
Saturday Evening Post Goes Retro for Mad Men Cover: Sharif Tarabay, the artist responsible for the March/April 2014 cover of The Saturday Evening Post, is thrilled. Because while he has in the past done Norman Rockwell-inspired work, this is the first time such an illustration has adorned the latter’s eponymous publication: “I’ve done many illustrations inspired by Rockwell’s classic covers throughout my career,” says the painter. “To illustrate a cover for The Saturday Evening Post based on one of Rockwell’s paintings - Window Washer – is a thrill and a highlight of my career.” That original Rockwell illustration, which appeared in the September 17, 1960 issue and below the great Tarabay treatment, with a certain familiar face very cleverly transposed into the window washer position. More Norman Rockwell window cleaning blogs here.

 
The Mole & Jersey Show Episode 14: We have an interview with Wagga from WCM TV, and Window Cleaning Magazine. We talk about consistancy and of course our FAIL of the week is awesome! Watch and Share the show, and hey...Subscribe would you?
The Segments:
4:05 Marketing Madness...Professional or not? 
11:34 The Chop Chop...Wagga
18:05 Fail of the Week
22:41 Top 5....Employee Problems
The Mole & jersey Show Episode 15 below with a newer host!.. click the picture.
http://windowcleaningresource.com/vBulletin/vbtube_show.php?tubeid=1088&name=mole-jersey-show-ep15-window-cleaning-pressure-washing-show

‘I get food and I get a shower. . . but it’s very hard to find a bed for the night’ - There are meals for homeless people in Dublin, but getting a bed is more difficult. At five minutes to four on a rain-sodden afternoon, Tomas’s search for a bed begins. There’s a freephone number to call to get your name down on the list for an emergency bed. The operators come on only from about 4.30pm, he says, but it’s best to call early. The automated voice tells him he is 18th in the queue. He waits, holding the mobile phone by his ear. And waits. After an hour and 17 minutes the line goes dead. There’s no sound. Maybe there was a problem with his phone?
He walks across the city to go to his English class, just off Bolton Street. It’s a free programme run in an adult education centre twice a week. When he came to Ireland from Slovakia seven years ago he couldn’t believe so many foreigners didn’t bother to learn the language. Being able to communicate is important if he’s going to get a job, he says. Back home he worked as a professional window cleaner and got all the necessary qualifications for using safety harnesses on tall buildings. Then his friend in Naas told him the wages in Ireland were many times better. It seemed like a good idea. His relationship with his long-term girlfriend had broken up. She was living with another man. The hardest part was leaving his three-year-old son behind, not knowing when he would see him again.
Social insurance stamps - He doesn’t get social welfare, because the officials say he’s not entitled to it. Tomas says he worked for about 2½ years in Dublin doing painting, plastering and window cleaning. It was mostly for cash, so he wasn’t getting social insurance stamps. At 10.30pm he tries the number again. He get through quickly this time. But the voice at the end of the line says all the emergency beds are full. There is a sleeping bag available, he’s told, if he wants to keep warm on the street, But it’s not so much the cold as the wet that’s the problem. The rain is now hurtling down in sheets. Flood warnings are in operation in parts of the city.
He puts his backpack on and walks in the direction of St James’s Hospital. Why doesn’t he go home? It’s complicated, he says.  He doesn’t want to have to answer all the intrusive questions. He also feels ashamed of where he is now. Once he gets a job and is back on his feet he might return. At the hospital’s accident and emergency unit he sits in the corner, watching the television. His wet clothes are sticking to him.
Tomas doesn’t take drugs. He drinks sometimes but only to help catch some sleep if he doesn’t have a bed. Most nights he generally gets a bed but increasingly there are too few to go around. He’s about to nod off when a nurse asks him if he’s here to see a doctor. When he says he isn’t, he’s asked to leave. It’s just after three in the morning. After about four years on the streets you begin to see the city differently. You recognise all the other homeless people. You see the city is a place where men and women struggle to survive. He lists off names and where he used to see the people. Sixteen in all. One had epilepsy, another was a heavy drinker. The list goes on.
The rain has eased off by now. He heads down towards Merchant’s Quay, where Merchant’s Quay Ireland serves breakfast to homeless people in three or four hours’ time.  Then he’ll head on to Trust, located in a basement near the Iveagh Buildings,where’ll he have a shower and hopefully get some fresh runners. It’s one good thing about being a homeless person in Dublin, Tomas says. You don’t go hungry. There’s always somewhere to eat. But getting a bed is another matter. Tomas’s name has been changed, at his request

The Snowden Files by Luke Harding – review: We live in a new world, and a scary one: this is a riveting read that unravels the mysteries behind the Snowden revelationsHarding writes that in the immediate aftermath of Snowden's revelations, construction crews appeared during the night outside the offices of the Guardian and the homes of its reporters, "taxi drivers" got mysteriously lost, "window cleaners" began loitering outside meeting rooms. Those trying to report the story found their lives inconvenienced – and occasionally they got a little scared – but it hardly put them off what they were doing.

Well-known Winslow singer, window cleaner and retained firefighter Paul French is one half of the tribute act, along with Mike Gethin. The evening is being organised by the WinslowAnglo-French Twinning Association (WAFTA) to raise money for the next visit by their counterparts from Cours La Ville in 2015. The two towns take it in turns to host each other, and this year it is Winslow’s turn to go to France. Seating for the tribute night will be cabaret style, on tables of six to eight people. There will also be a disco. The £12 ticket price includes a fish and chip supper freshly cooked on the premises by Little Horwood company Howe and Co.

http://www.southwestbusiness.co.uk/news/20022014082237-lone-wolf-management-secures-rising-star-award-from-the-cheltenham-branch-of-the-federation-of-small-businesses-only-18-months-after-formation/
Lone Wolf Management secures Rising Star Award from the Cheltenham branch of the Federation of Small Businesses only 18 months after formation: A company which now has five divisions only 18 months after starting up has been presented with a special business award. Lone Wolf Management received the Rising Star Award from the Cheltenham branch of the Federation of Small Businesses. Managing director Gil Collins, whose Cheltenham based company’s activities include security, window cleaning and catering, was presented with the accolade by Cheltenham MP Martin Horwood. Gil said: It is marvellous to receive this award, my staff and I are very proud to be honoured in this way.”
His aim was to support Gloucestershire businesses by purchasing locally and employing local people wherever possible. FSB branch chairman Tim Calway said he was delighted with Lone Wolf’s success and its support for local businesses. Martin Horwood said: “Economists and planners at national level are always telling us that small businesses are the ones that drive economic growth but it’s great to see the FSB celebrating this here on the ground in Cheltenham. “They’re taking practical steps to raise the profile of rising stars like Lone Wolf Management and encouraging their success.” The Gloucester Citizen and Gloucestershire Echo together with Harrison Clark Rickerbys solicitors are promoting county products and services through the Made in Gloucestershire campaign.

Linda cleans up with her first business: Linda Richardson is all set to clean up with her local business - despite starting up in 2009 at the heart of the banking crash. Since Linda, a 45 year old mother of one child, launched Connect Cleaning Services in Melling she has steadily built up her company and now she is planning to expand and take on more staff. She said: “This is my first business - I’d never run a business before. In fact, before I started up I was a housewife. ”But my circumstances changed very suddenly and I thought I didn’t want just to sit back - so I thought I’d give it a go.“
Her business now includes house-cleaning and maid service, commercial and office cleaning and window, upholstery and carpet cleaning services. ”My business partner, Dean Boyle, and I did the preparatory work and we launched Connect Cleaning Services at the height of the recession. But we had a good business idea, we had a good work ethic and we’ve built up the business’ reputation over time.“ She pointed out that word of mouth is crucially important to the business. ”I have to be patient - it hasn’t all happened at once. “We have built up the business, built up our reputation and now I’m ready to go further and build on what we have achieved so far. ”It’s a lot about building up a good reputation - which is exactly what we have done. “We are getting calls for new business all the time. We are very ambitious for this business. We are working hard and we are making it work.”
Linda added: “We now want to provide employment opportunities for more local people. Currently we employ four and we will be taking more on. We really want to build this business and take on more people and boost the local economy.” Sefton Central MP Bill Esterson met Linda and explained how impressed he was with her business. He said: “Linda really is an inspiration. ”She set up her business and is really making it a success. “We know how small local businesses are struggling to survive and compete so it is good to hear about a small local business, set up by first-time entrepreneurs, who have managed not just to make a go of it, but to make it a local success story.”

Walmart launches eco-friendly household cleaners: Walmart has introduced a four-product line of all-natural household cleaning products under its private-label Great Value brand. The line, Great Value Naturals, was introduced in late 2013 in 2,000 Walmart stores across the U.S., and includes a liquid laundry detergent, a multi-surface cleaner, a glass and window cleaner, and an automatic dishwasher gel, packaged in recyclable materials.
“The launch of Great Value Naturals is an important step in making green cleaning habits an affordable option for millions of consumers,” says Alberto Dominguez, Walmart Vice President and Divisional Merchandise Manager. “Many consumers have the perception that all-natural cleaners are more expensive and don’t work as well as traditional cleaning products. Great Value Naturals addresses those concerns by combining affordability, performance, and care for the environment.”
The products are made from plant-based, all-natural Evolve cleaning technology from Agaia, Inc. and are 100-percent chemical- and toxin-free, biodegradable, and non-allergenic. The technology is said to effectively capture and break down soils, grease, grime, and odor-causing bacteria without leaving harmful residues or irritants behind on the skin, surfaces, or the environment. 

Concerns over toxic substances — the new term seems to be "chemicals of concern" - in our everyday lives have been around since Rachel Carson penned "Silent Spring" more than a half-century ago. But getting the most problematic chemicals out of products and supply chains has been slow-going, especially as government regulation of such chemicals has been timid. Regulation by the marketplace is another matter. Over the past year, big retailers such as Wal-Mart and Target have approached the issue head-on, pushing suppliers to disclose ingredients or simply vowing to phase out use of some chemicals in the products they sell.
Wal-Mart announced a policy to require manufacturers of cosmetics and cleaning products to disclose ingredients in their products and remove priority hazardous chemicals. The company said it would start with 10 priority chemicals, although it isn't yet disclosing which ones, and some critics both praised the policy and pointed to its flaws. Target, for its part, announced a partnership with UL's GoodGuide to establish sustainability standards for some 7,500 products, focusing on personal care and household cleaning products — "direct-exposure chemical products" with a strong focus on toxic or otherwise problematic ingredients. 

XENIA — Remember the old joke about the housekeeper who always says “I don’t do windows…” You don’t have to worry about that when you contact one of the newest businesses in Xenia. “We’re dependable and reliable,” Shane Hartley, owner of the local Fish Window Cleaning location, said. “And, we’re year round.” Hartley, a former police officer in Athens, Ohio, and an US Army vet with 27 years under his belt, said that when he returned from Afghanistan in 2012, he began looking for a business he could own and operate. “I was looking for a different franchise,” he added. “I worked through FranChoice and they matched me up with three potential franchises. “Fish looked to be the best of the three because of three things: the simplicity of its system, the low overhead, and a very needed service.” “The franchises are independently owned and operated,” Hartley said. “We’re licensed, bonded and fully insured. We’re glad to give free estimates for both commercial and residential customers.”
Along with the window cleaning, the Roseville, Ohio native said Fish also cleans gutters and performs light power-washing on soffits and siding. “And, really, we can clean anything glass,” Hartley continued. “We’ve done chandeliers, not to mention other light fixtures.” To prepare for the new business, Hartley completed multiple weeks of training in the Xenia area and at Fish Window Cleaning headquarters in St. Louis, Mo. He is currently hiring and accepting applications. “I am committed to providing quality service and 100 percent satisfaction that FISH customers have come to expect,” said Hartley. “I look forward to meeting my residential and commercial neighbors and becoming the top, reliable provider for window cleaning needs. “So far, I’ve found everyone extremely friendly and I’ve met some great people,” he continued. “I have not had a single business turn me away and not let me write a free estimate.” Hartley is providing his services for commercial and residential customers in East Dayton, Beavercreek, Fairborn, Kettering and Xenia. “My region is pretty much from I-75 east, to Fairborn in the north and south almost to where I-75 and I-675 come together,” he said. Hartley said he currently has a staff of two and is looking to expand. “I am hiring,” he said. “I’ve posted all over. I need two additional employees for going on runs, and I also need a salesperson.”

http://www.eagletribune.com/business/x1262680352/Business-briefs
MANCHESTER — Peter Thurston, owner of the local Fish Window Cleaning, was presented with the Soaring Eagle Award at the annual Fish Window Cleaning Convention in St. Louis, Mo. Thurston received the award for his success in taking over an existing franchise and increasing the franchise’s performance in sales, profitability and operational excellence. Thurston took over the business in 2011, and his office provides service to commercial and residential customers in Manchester, Nashua, Salem, Bedford, Derry, Londonderry, Merrimack, Windham, and Hudson, N.H.

http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/20mph-limit-city-s-new-zones-making-difference/story-20673340-detail/story.html
20mph limits: Are Bristol's new zones making a difference? Between condolences, one resident says: "The hill is treated like a drag race going up and people do not appreciate their speed going down". Another adds: "Sadly, most cars travelling up or down Ashley Hill do not adhere to the 20 mph speed limit." Jason Hook, 46, from Southmead who runs a window cleaning business agrees. His job sees him travel around the city all day. He said: "It is just ridiculous. It makes my day longer, adds time and adds cost to everything. It's wasting my time and causing congestion. And I can't put my prices up because people are still suffering from the recession."

Mouldy: Why won't council do anything about our damp homes? Mrs Shepherd is not the only one with damp problems on the small estate. About 25 of the 70 homes have all suffered from them for more than a decade. They are portable homes which bolt together in two halves and which can be transported on the back of a lorry. They are slightly smaller than the popular old pre-fabs in which most of the residents used to live. Retired window cleaner John Emery (pictured left) and his wife Janet have had a catalogue of problems. Their problems began when they discovered a gas pipe in their front bedroom wardrobe was mouldy and dripping with condensation.

http://www.erietvnews.com/story/24767669/erie-heat-wave-48-degrees
Erie Heat Wave 48 Degrees: The big change in temperatures seemed to change the collective mood of Erie residents. While you wouldn't normally think of 48 degrees as a heat wave, after the February weather Erie has experienced, that's exactly what people were calling it. The average high and low temperature for the month, according to the National Weather Service is 16.7 degrees that's nearly 11 degrees below normal.  Erie has seen three sub zero temperature days including -7 degrees on Monday morning, and collected nearly two feet of new snow for the month. And we saw a couple of window washers out too.  They normally have to use an anti-freeze in their window washing water, but not today. "Yeah, yeah...everybody's been calling it a heat wave, I'm not from here, they say Erie weather is so funny, but it's a great day," said Mark Hodge of Candia Window Washers.

Chasing his dream: The lack of support for independent filmmakers in Qatar is an obstacle, according to Klim. Five years back, Alex Klim moved to Doha from Vienna to pursue an exciting proposition in the telecommunications field. Like most Western expats in Qatar, the Austrian enjoyed a well-heeled lifestyle and comforts that could silence all complaints. Living on the 22nd floor of a West Bay high-rise has helped Klim with his next project — The Doha Spiderman. It’s an action documentary that looks into a day in the life of a rope access technician, or a window cleaner. “When I saw them cleaning glasses of my apartment from the outside using suction mounts, I was worried for them. I tracked them for a day and mounted GoPro cameras on their helmets,” he says. It’s finding and telling such stories that has made Klim fall in love with Qatar.

Russians and their vodka: In 1985, Mikhail Gorbachev attempted to curb drinking with a number of reforms, including reducing the supply of vodka, increasing its price, and prosecuting people who showed up to work inebriated. This was well intentioned, but like other attempts at prohibition, it did more harm than good. People turned instead to drugs and unregulated alcohols like cologne, antiseptics, and samogon — a homemade concoction made by distilling anything from sugar, window-cleaners, and even stolen aircraft de-icing fluids. As can be expected with de-icing fluid, drinkers of the poison would often hallucinate, go blind, or die. The anti-alcohol campaign was officially abandoned in 1988.

In her brightly painted studio, composer Elena Kats-Chernin is all too aware of the importance of beginnings. Over the years she has come to trust that divine intervention - or the mysterious workings of the subconscious - will come to her rescue in the process of creating. Sitting at her piano, scribbling away, she has had many moments of frustration with pages ripped and discarded as she works away through all that is wrong to discover what feels right. ''Composing is like cleaning a window,'' she says. ''You have to remove all the dirt and grease before you can see.''

“Window walls have already been around in their current form for 20 to 30 years and we expect that they will have a 30- to 35-year lifespan.” Click to enlarge.
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2014/02/19/degrading_condo_windows_expected_to_trigger_major_wave_of_replacements.html
Degrading condo windows expected to trigger major wave of replacements: University of Waterloo professor John Straube says buyers of glass condos should consider cost lifespan of window walls and cost to replace. That million-dollar condo view comes with a hidden price tag as degrading windows in older buildings are expected to trigger a major wave of replacements which could cost owners upwards of $100,000, a university professor says.
“Window walls have already been around in their current form for 20 to 30 years and we expect that they will have a 30- to 35-year lifespan,” says University of Waterloo professor John Straube, who divides his time between the civil engineering and architecture departments. “Over the entire face of a large condo, they could cost $100,000 (a unit)” to replace, said Straube, noting the figure is a projection because “we don’t actually have that much experience. “What we do know is that’s what it has cost to replace glass in limited buildings to date.”
The adhesive, gaskets and sealants used to install window walls eventually degrade due to temperature changes and exposure to the sun, allowing moisture and water to get in. The glass wall’s aluminum frame becomes pitted and disfigured over time due to corrosion.

Girl who fell to her death from window of Bradford house named as Amrita Kaur - A 22-month-old girl who died after falling from the window of a house with her mother has been named by police. Amrita Kaur died on Tuesday morning after she was found unconscious outside a house in Delamere Street, Bradford, West Yorkshire Police said. Her 36-year-old mother was also injured in the incident and was later arrested on suspicion of her daughter's murder. Amrita and her mother were discovered in the back garden of the end-terrace house by a neighbour who called police and paramedics.
They appeared to have fallen from a first-floor window. Both were taken to hospital but Amrita died soon afterwards. People living in the quiet, residential street described their shock at what happened in the house many thought was empty. According to reports, neighbour Mohammed Yaseen raised the alarm after he was alerted by the woman banging on a bin before he and a local window cleaner tried to help with first aid.

Josefat "Joe" Gawron passed away at his home in Monroe on Saturday, February 15, 2014. He was 88. Son of the late Maria Szubala Gawron and Petro Gawron, he was born in Trembowla, Ternopil, Ukraine on May 26, 1925. 
Joe was a retired Window Cleaner for Arcade Window Cleaners in New York, NY. He was the widower of Maria Tychan Gawron. He is survived by his sons, Dmytro Gawron and his wife, Olga of Monroe and Wasyl Gawron and his wife, Pat of the Bronx; three grandchildren, Marc Gawron, Adrienne Fil and William Gawron; and two great grandchildren, Markian Fil and Maksym Fil.

Australian fathers who murder their sons and daughters: The children had presents for Robert Farquharson on the fateful 2005 day. Saucepans, as well as a framed photo of the three boys. It was Father’s Day and it had been a big afternoon for Farquharson, a window cleaner, and his three boys, Jai, 10, Tyler, 7, and Bailey, 2. According to a detailed account in The Australian Book of Family Murders, they had visited Geelong, 35 minutes away from their home in Winchelsea, where he had purchased presents for the boys. They dropped in on their aunt and ate KFC for dinner before they headed home. Farquharson has always claimed he does not remember what happened next, except that he had a coughing fit and blacked out.
But courts have convicted him twice, in 2007 and 2010, for murdering his children that evening. He steered his car off the Princes Highway into a dark, deep dam. All of his children drowned. He survived. The smoking gun in the Farquharson case was a witness who said he told him he resented his ex-wife and had said he wanted to take the most important thing away from her — the children. “You wiped out your entire family in one act,” ruled Justice Philip Cummins in the first trial. “Only the two parents remained: you, because you had always intended to save yourself, and their mother, because you intended her to live a life of suffering.” Farquharson has also lost a High Court appeal bid. He is serving a minimum sentence of 33 years behind bars.

http://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/news/crime/window-cleaner-gave-false-details-1-6440262
Window cleaner gave false details: A window cleaner lied to police and gave a false name when he was caught behind the wheel while banned on New Year’s Eve. Christopher Johnstone, 32, of Wilton Parade, North Shore, pleaded guilty to driving while disqualified and without insurance. He was sentenced to do 180 hours unpaid work for the community, banned from the road for 16 months and ordered to pay £60 victims’ surcharge by District Judge Sam Goozee sitting at Blackpool Magistrates’ Court. Harold Smith, prosecuting, said police stopped Johnstone as he drove a Peugeot on Park Road, Blackpool on December 31 at 11.25pm. Robert Castle, defending, said Johnstone had been impulsive and stupid because he wanted to assist his sister.

Thursday, 20 February 2014

Window Cleaners Among WWI Bravest

Window cleaners 'among WWI bravest'
http://news.uk.msn.com/window-cleaners-among-wwi-bravest
Window cleaners 'among WWI bravest'- Teachers, window cleaners and cotton workers have been identified as among the "bravest" professions during the First World War, according to a study. Online history website Ancestry.co.uk said an analysis of 2.8 million service records from 1914-20 highlighted how ordinary workers with barely any military training risked their lives on the front line. Most medal winners were miners or agricultural labourers, but professions such as teaching and window cleaning featured strongly, said the report.

Fishermen, doctors, barbers and policemen were also named among the top 10 professions for medal winners, said Ancestry. Content manager Miriam Silverman said: "While teachers, doctors or policemen may have had skills or leadership qualities that could have prepared them better for the front line, what this data really tells us is that it was the ordinary men with everyday professions that made some of the most extraordinary heroes."


http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/teachers-window-cleaners-braver-bankers-says-study-1437266
Teachers and Window Cleaners Braver Than Bankers, Says Study - Teachers and window cleaners were braver than bankers, according to a study of wartime records. Studies showed school masters received the most military medals per head for their role on the war.

Window cleaners, cotton mill workers and fishermen also ranked in the top 10 for the bravest professions, according to family history website Ancestry, which studied 2.8 million services records to compile the list. Ancestry tallied the number of Military Cross, Distinguished Conduct Medal, Victoria Cross and Meritorious Service Medal winners against the number of people in work in 1911.

Ancestry's Miriam Silverman said: "While teachers, doctors and policemen may have had the skills or leadership qualities that could have prepared them better for the frontline, what this data really tells us is that it was the ordinary men with everyday professions that made some of the most extraordinary heroes." While teachers today might be used to battling students sat at the back row, they were at their most formidable and bravest on the front line during World War One.

Top 10 bravest professions:
1. Teacher 2. Window cleaner 3. Cotton mill worker 4. Fisherman 5. Doctor
6. Servant 7. Barber 8. Merchant 9. Police officer 10. Banker

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/10649262/Window-cleaners-and-teachers-the-bravest-professions-of-WW1.html
Window cleaners and teachers - the 'bravest' professions of WW1 - Window cleaners and teachers were more likely than those of any other profession serving in the British armed forces in the First World War to be decorated for bravery, research finds.

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